13 Things Strong-Willed People Won’t Do

13 things strong willed people don't doStrong-willed people get a bad rap. They can be seen as stubborn, dominant, unreasonable or headstrong.

But are they, really?Dealing with a strong-willed spouse or child can be quite challenging. Our marriage is more unique in that we have not one, but two strong-willed individuals (how’d that happen?!). And odds are high we will end up with strong-willed children to boot.

If you fail to understand your strong-willed spouse or child, it can easily lead to power struggles, conflict and misunderstanding of character.

Our society often views being “strong-willed” as a negative personality trait that must be managed or overcome.

But what if the very thing you see as a weakness is actually a God-given strength?

In her book, 13 Things Mentally Strong People Don’t Do, Amy Morin highlights the healthy habits of those with a strong mind. But what about those with a strong willWhat are the healthy habits that make the strong-willed strong? What strengths do they have to offer in a marriage or family that generally get overlooked?

Here are 13 things strong-willed people won’t do that contribute to their overall success, courage and resilience in life.

1. They won’t bend to the pressure of others. Strong-willed people are highly autonomous so they won’t give in easily to the demands of others. If they don’t want to, you can’t make them. It’s as simple as that. Their devotion to personal sovereignty gives them the ability to maintain strong boundaries and resist peer pressure.

2. They won’t give up easily. Failure is not an option for the strong-willed. Hardship only makes them stronger. They are survivors. They will persevere through even the most difficult of circumstances.

3. They won’t betray their values. Strong-willed people hold fiercely to their personal views and beliefs. Their convictions serve as their navigation system in life and they are unlikely to compromise what’s important. Strong-willed individuals will stand up for what they believe regardless of opposition.

4. They won’t accept opinion as truth. Strong-willed people are cautious and skeptical when it comes to the opinions of others. Just because you say it, doesn’t make it true. They want proof. They may expect you to explain your position and give reasons for your argument before they are willing to do it or see it your way. This provides them with the liberty to evaluate an idea and keeps them from blindly accepting inaccurate information.

5. They won’t allow their schedule to be dictated by others. Strong-willed people are fiercely independent and want to manage themselves. A self-starter, they are usually good at setting goals, accomplishing tasks and determining their own schedule and use of time.

6. They won’t back down from a challenge. Give them a problem and they will rise to the occasion. Strong-willed people see challenges as an opportunity for growth. They are creative thinkers and will find a way to fix or resolve the issue even if it’s the last thing they do.

7. They won’t be defined by their circumstances. Strong-willed people see themselves as masters of their own fate. They take life by the reins instead of allowing their circumstances to dictate their destiny. They don’t allow negative experiences to defeat them. Instead, they learn from their pain and difficulty so they can keep moving forward.

8. They won’t give in to fear. Strong-willed people may feel anxious but they don’t let their feelings control their actions. They feel the fear and do it anyway. In an emergency, they are quick to rush in, take charge and respond to those in need.

9. They won’t shy away from responsibility or leadership. Strong-willed people are action-oriented and possess a strong desire to lead. They automatically want to know who’s in charge. Poor leadership or a lack of competency is like fingernails on a chalkboard to the strong-willed. When faced with a leadership vacuum, the strong-willed person will step in and take over in order to provide direction, vision and management.

10. They won’t abandon their dreams. Strong-willed people often have a firm sense of purpose. They dream big dreams and then figure out how to make them come true. Tell them they won’t achieve their dream and they will do it just to prove you wrong. Strong-willed people live passionately and succeed in what they set out to accomplish.

11. They won’t resist change. Strong-willed people understand that change is a natural part of life. Since change is inevitable, they prefer to get out in front of it. They adapt to their situation in order to control how it affects and changes them.

12. They won’t worry about what others think of them. Many strong-willed people don’t care about pleasing others. They don’t allow the opinions, thoughts or judgment of others to determine their sense of identity and self-worth. They remain true to themselves, regardless of what others may think.

13. They won’t stay silent. Strong-willed people often share their views and opinions. They have a powerful desire to be heard and understood. They are usually very honest and forthcoming, especially when they disagree. This provides them with the ability to speak out against injustice and and on behalf of those who cannot speak for themselves.

When these habits are practiced in a mature way, a strong-willed person can be a great asset to any team, marriage or family!

  • They are steadfast.
  • They are determined.
  • They are loyal.
  • They are perceptive.
  • They are independent.
  • They are problem-solvers.
  • They are resilient.
  • They are courageous.
  • They are leaders.
  • They are dreamers.
  • They are adaptable.
  • They are confident.
  • They are honest.

Appreciating the strengths of your strong-willed spouse or child will go a long way toward building a healthier relationship!

Do you have a strong-willed person in your family? What strengths do you see in him or her? Comment below!

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